My History in Collage / Photomontage: Eva Lake/ 1978 - 2021

This page tells the story of my early work. Recent works can be found in the links below:

The Witness

The Nurses

Cactus Flowers

Her Highness

Bodyparts

In Every Dream Home A Heartache

The Arrangements

My Egypt

TypeFace

The Torso

Anonymous Women

Targets

The Judd Montages

The Marriage

 

                    

 

Before I ever collaged, I collected old magazines and nostalgia.

 

                       

 

I read them cover to cover and eventually I cut them up to create my own stories.

 

                  

 

My first collages were made in high school, the early 70's. I was looking at Interview, Richard Hamilton and Pop Art.

 

                     

 

Plus like many teenage girls I also devoured magazines aimed at beauty and fashion.

 

 

                      

 

In the punk era, my work was made for Xeroxed fanzines and punk posters.

 

 

                       

 

By that time I knew about Dada, having seen Dada and Surrealism Revisited at London's Hayward Gallery in 1978.

 

 

                    

 

 My heroes then were John Heartfield, Hannah Hoch and Man Ray. They still are.

 

 

                   

 

In the early 80s the work, like the music subculture of the time, took a turn towards New Romanticism.

 

                 

 

I worked in a record store in San Francisco and was influenced by Post Punk and classic literature.
 

 

                       

 

Over the years I've made all kinds of work - painting, drawing, music, dance, performance - but collage/photomontage was and is the most constant.

 

 

                          

 

I've called it a Bedroom Art as often that was the only place I had to work in. I completely relate to the "Cut with a Kitchen Knife" idea.

 

 

                  

 

Sometimes images traveled around with me for decades before I used them.

 

 

                 

 

It is the medium most about my own life and whatever concerned me at the time - love, labor, style, war, work, loneliness, respect, art.

 

 

                         

 

Because it was so personal and often private, it could survive. And because it often was not shown, it became even more personal.

 

           

 

The work started out as messages to the masses but in time became more like a diary.

 

 

                      

 

9/11 was a strange time of regeneration for me. It came at a time when I was re-examining the state of my own art affairs.

 

 

                       

 

Suddenly not alone in paranoia, I returned to previous themes and works I had made years ago had a renewed meaning.

 

Collages from about 2007 onwards you can explore in my WORK page. Thank you.
 

 

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Self Portrait, 1978